The Register Forum

An Overview of the Final Presidential Debate
Introducing CRLS’ New Student Government
CRLS’ First Virtual Club Day A Success Despite Online Limitations
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A Recap of the 2020 Boston Celtics Season
The Reality of a Winter Sports Season Remains Unclear

The Reality of a Winter Sports Season Remains Unclear

November 1, 2020

In Massachusetts, fall sports have begun again for high schoolers; however, the possibility of a return to competition in the winter remains up in the air. The looming possibility of a second COVID-19 spike, as well as the fact that winter sports are played indoors, are the two  main factors in causing this shared uncertainty. The return to play for winter sports teams, both at CRLS and in Massachusetts as a whole, is reliant on the guidelines that will be released by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental affairs (EOEEA). In the summer, when the guidelines were initially posted for fall sports, the EOEEA mandated wearing masks during all competition and social distancing when possible. On winter sports, Tom Arria, the CRLS Athletic Director and Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) board member, says, “What I can share is that the MIAA does have to wait for guidance from the [EOEEA]—which is scheduled to release guidance for all winter sports the first week in November.”

NBA Bubble Successfully Protects America’s Basketball

NBA Bubble Successfully Protects America’s Basketball

October 30, 2020

As the world began to cope with the sudden changes that the COVID-19 pandemic had brought forth, professional sports organizations were forced to find safe and innovative ways to return to play. Similar to each nation’s vastly different responses to the pandemic, different leagues’ individual plans varied significantly. The National Basketball Association (NBA) is one of the leagues in the United States that has done an exemplary job in protecting the health and safety of its athletes. On October 8th, ESPN released an article explaining that, after its season was put on hold in mid-March due to the uncertainty surrounding COVID-19, the NBA quickly began considering ways to hold a safe, yet entertaining season. The NBA held discussions surrounding the possibility of a bubble, an area where players can safely play while being separated from loved ones and the rest of America for a certain period of time. Later, the Walt Disney World Resort—a longtime partner of the NBA through its ownership of ESPN—reached out to the Association early on in the process and offered its resort in Orlando as a setting for the ‘bubble.' After the NBA graciously accepted Disney's offer, rules began to emerge.

2020 Was a Bad Year for the Red Sox, But There Is Hope for the Future

2020 Was a Bad Year for the Red Sox, But There Is Hope for the Future

October 29, 2020

Yikes! The 2020 Red Sox season was one of the worst in recent memory. Only two years removed from the historic 119 win of their 2018 campaign, the Sox finished the pandemic-shortened 60 game 2020 season dead last in the AL East. With no fans in attendance at Fenway Park and a 54% drop in ratings from the previous year, many fans likely tuned out the losing Sox in favor of watching the more exciting Celtics and Bruins. In case you missed it, here are some of the major developments from 2020, as well as several questions surrounding the team as it enters the offseason.

Club Sports Attempt a Return in the Time of COVID-19

Club Sports Attempt a Return in the Time of COVID-19

October 6, 2020

On September 3rd, Cambridge Public Schools’ (CPS) school committee voted to approve the return of high school athletics at CRLS with strict regulations. Since the beginning of the summer, youth and club sports across the country have already begun their reopening protocols.  In March, when the country was just beginning to reckon with the immense danger that COVID-19 presented, youth, club, and high school sports across the country were postponed, and put on hold for months. For many teenagers and children, sports are a huge part of their lifestyle and character, and the cancellation of senior year seasons and “what could have been” clearly impacted these people. 

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Apple Rosette Recipe for the Winter
The Register Forum’s Suggested Songs for October
Movie Theaters Struggle & Movie Delays Continue Due to the Pandemic

Movie Theaters Struggle & Movie Delays Continue Due to the Pandemic

October 31, 2020

A Life on Our Planet: Not Your Average Science Museum Documentary

A Life on Our Planet: Not Your Average Science Museum Documentary

October 30, 2020

The brand new documentary, David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet, released on Netflix on October 4th, is anything but your average science museum documentary. The film opens with the protagonist and narrator, the world famous naturalist David Attenborough, on the remains of what used to be a home in Chernobyl, a small Ukranian town known worldwide for hosting  a nuclear plant meltdown that rendered the town completely uninhabitable, making it one of the worst man-made disasters of the last century.  Once the stage is set, the audience is guided through Attenborough’s 60 year career as a naturalist, and how sharply the world has changed around him in those years. The film is centered around the steep decrease of biodiversity in our planet. It is organized chronologically through the decades, marking the different stages of Attenborough’s career and the continuous losses our planet endured over each ten-year period. Before every new decade, producer Colin Butfield added a black screen with white font reading the global population, the CO2 levels, and the percentage of wildlife remaining. This touch allows the viewer to connect the plunge that our planet has taken with individuals, as well as sets of events that have taken place since the 1930s. 

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The Student Newspaper of Cambridge Rindge and Latin
The Student Newspaper of Cambridge Rindge and Latin