The Register Forum

Hurricane Sally Wreaks Havoc in the Southeast

Hurricane Sally Wreaks Havoc in the Southeast

October 9, 2020

On September 15th, a catastrophic hurricane, Sally, loomed above the Gulf of Mexico. Already, it was working its way toward the Southeast of the U.S. at a mere two miles per hour, yet leaving meteorologists concerned by the severe damage it was inflicting to the coasts of Mississippi, Florida, and Alabama--the slow pace was actually causing more harm. By Wednesday, hundreds of people in that area were already desperately escaping floodwaters. “It's incredible that so many storms can develop all at once and that we've already had so many hurricanes when there are still two months left in the hurricane season,” physics teacher Ms. Kristin Newton told the Register Forum. “I'm also baffled by the idea of getting over 30 inches of rain at once. I can't even imagine it.” That Wednesday night, the Category 2 hurricane was already ten miles northwest of Troy, Alabama and was continuing its way up to the Northeast at nine miles per hour with wind speeds of 35 miles per hour. Citizens panicked as their towns flooded, the rivers filled up, and houses and other buildings were eradicated. “The effects of Hurricane Sally on the coast of the State of Florida are devastating. Anytime people live near the ocean, they have an even greater chance of being affected by harsh weather such as this recent storm. It is interesting to know that 2020 now has a record breaking Atlantic hurricane season. I believe the earth goes through cycles every 100+ years, and we may be living through one of those right now,”

Social Gatherings for Teenagers in the Age of COVID-19

Charlie Bonney, Managing Editor

October 8, 2020

Although Cambridge Public Schools (CPS) have chosen not to return to in-person learning this fall for most students, some school districts around the Boston area have invited students back to learn in the classroom. The return to school in the COVID-19 era is creating difficulties for administrators who are seeking to create a better learning environment while also ensuring the safety of their students. However, administrators are worried about whether or not safety measures in school buildings will be enough to open schools without the risk of an outbreak.  Recently, Dover-Sherborn High School and Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School both announced that they would begin the school year online. This announcement altered the schools’ original plan, which was to begin the school year in a hybrid—online and in-person—format. The alterations made by both of the schools came after police broke up parties violating state-mandated COVID-19 restrictions in both school districts. The Lincoln-Sudbury case has made national headlines as charges have been filed against the hosts of the party as well as the parents of the hosts. 

Teachers and Students Try to Engage on First Day Back

Luna Valayannopoulos-Akrivou, Around School Editor

October 8, 2020

This year’s first day of school was anything but typical, with the transition to online learning. While students were not able to meet up on campus, CRLS was still able to welcome over 900 new students to the school. Freshman Julliette Coley emphasizes the fact that, “six months ago, around the time the COVID-19 pandemic became major in the United States, I never would've expected my first day, never mind potentially my first semester and my first year of high school to be done remotely.”  Teachers were as nervous as students, as they were tasked with changing their whole curriculum and lesson plans to fit the remote learning guidelines. Ms. Kristen Newton, a physics teacher, said that, “We are literally rebuilding everything we are teaching from scratch. Everything about the way that learning happens has to change.” 

Chadwick Boseman: A Powerful Life Cut Too Short

Chadwick Boseman: A Powerful Life Cut Too Short

October 7, 2020

At the tail end of the summer, on August 28th, 2020, Chadwick Boseman passed away. Boseman, the man responsible for playing T’Challa in the adored Black Panther movie and the Marvel Avengers movie series, died as a result of complications related to a four years-long battle with colon cancer.  Boseman’s first major role was as the first Black Major League Baseball (MLB) star, Jackie Robinson, in the 2013 movie, 42. He, in fact, died on the same day the MLB celebrates Jackie Robinson Day every year. However, his best-known performance—the one which shot him into stardom—was as Prince T’Challa of Wakanda in the 2018 blockbuster movie, Black Panther (read the review of this movie here). This role was a very important one to Boseman, and he played it with both skill and respect. Regarding the significance of the role, especially when compared with other roles where he plays significant historical figures, Boseman said in an interview with USA Today, “I hesitate to say this is bigger—those are real historical figures and moments. But what this is, it’s a cultural moment that is happening right now. We’re not remembering breaking the color barrier or how funk was created. We’re living this.” To see yourself represented on screen is empowering, and Boseman, in all of his performances, strove to achieve that representation through every performance he made. 

A recent petition that circulated social media caused uproar about CRLS' old

School Committee Moves to Condemn Continued Use of Harmful Mascot

October 6, 2020

In early June, the use of a former mascot, deemed racist by many Cantabrigians, as a logo on merchandise for Cambridge Alumni was brought to the attention of the Cambridge Public Schools (CPS) community. A petition to discontinue the use of the logo gained momentum, and on Tuesday, September 15th, the School Committee met and reached a resolution regarding the petition. CRLS alumna, and leader in creating the petition, Tina Groeger ’04, recalls first seeing the logo on a directory. Produced by the Rindge Tech Alumni Association (RTAA), the directory was intended to encompass all Cambridge alumni, including those of the Rindge Technical School, Cambridge High and Latin, and the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School (CRLS).  In 1977, Rindge Tech and Cambridge High were combined to form CRLS. The mascot, intended to depict an indigenous person and betoken the Rindge Tech “Warriors,” was first employed by Rindge Tech in 1972 and went on to represent Cambridge through CRLS, until an indigenous student in 1989 brought the issue to the administration, and it was abolished. 

10 Fun Activities to Kick Off Your Fall

10 Fun Activities to Kick Off Your Fall

October 5, 2020

To my surprise, it’s starting to get cold much earlier than usual. The weather is usually warmer around these times, but fall couldn't wait, so we’ll have to say goodbye to summer and welcome the fresh smell of cider and turning leaves. Although virtual school isn’t exactly riveting, here are ten fun activities that you can and should do during the fall.

Record-Breaking Wildfires Spark Questions Regarding Global Warming

Record-Breaking Wildfires Spark Questions Regarding Global Warming

October 5, 2020

At the beginning of last month, California began to face some of the worst wildfires recorded in over 90 years. The Sacramento Bee, a local Californian newspaper, reported that during a massive mid-August thunderstorm, Northern California and the Bay Area were hit with thousands of lightning strikes, causing dozens of fires to ignite. Due to the late summer weather on the West Coast, large gusts of wind blew over the California area, causing the larger fires to erupt in size, engulfing California in flames. The Fresno Bee, another local paper based in Fresno, CA, stated on September 22nd that the ‘Creek Fire,’ which has run through Fresno and the Madera counties, burned over 286,000 acres, with only 32% of the fire being contained. This is only one of multiple fires sprouting all around California. These fires have demolished homes, taken lives, and destroyed forests which house millions of animals throughout the state. Freshman Isaac Wedaman states, “It's frustrating to see all these people displaced, and it’s hard to see fires around California spike throughout the years.”

'Zoom Bombings' Bring Problems to the First Week of School

‘Zoom Bombings’ Bring Problems to the First Week of School

October 5, 2020

In the first week of Cambridge Rindge and Latin’s first full-year online learning this fall, students faced an unexpected obstacle as many classes were interrupted by outbursts of “Zoom bombings.” CRLS started its online school year on Wednesday, September 16th, and received many reports from teachers saying that anonymous members on their Zoom calls had disrupted their class using explicit language and a variety of distracting audios.  After witnessing an episode of “Zoom bombing”, senior Jairee Torres said of the experience, “It was honestly unexpected and I didn't realize it was happening until I heard someone start cursing at my teacher and tell her to shut up, and she was sharing her screen and they were scribbling on it. It was kind of hectic, but it didn't last that long, luckily.”

A Tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg

A Tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg

October 5, 2020

On Friday, September 18th, the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, popularly known as RBG, shocked the nation. Ginsburg led an incredible life, characterized by her hard work, resilience, dedication, and commitment to the people of the United States. Her passing not only brought immense sorrow among Americans, but also fear. With the November election quickly approaching, the fate of the Supreme Court remains unknown. Whether or not Trump can appoint a justice before the election is determined by Congress, which is currently majority Republican. Regardless of what the future holds, the Register Forum remembers icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

In a Shortage of Labor, California Employs Inmates to Deal with Wildfires

In a Shortage of Labor, California Employs Inmates to Deal with Wildfires

October 5, 2020

The wildfires raging across millions of miles in California have remained the subject of headlines for months now, a significant feat considering the cataclysmic year 2020 has proven itself to be. The duration and severity of the disaster has only increased, as the fires continue to claim more land and lives.  Initially starting in early May, this most recent surge of wildfires has already broken records. 3.2 million acres of land have been burned up and down California in just five months compared to the 10.8 million acres burned over the last 10 years. For decades, as fires worsened, California has relied on the help of the “California Conservation Camp Program,” which allows prisoners from surrounding areas to help support state and local emergency services when they are overwhelmed. All inmates are willing volunteers for the program, and all receive the same entry level training that the professional California firefighters receive before starting the job. The training usually involves initial attack, mop up, and fireline construction, all physically demanding and often life-threatening tasks. 

The Future of Online Standardized Tests

The Future of Online Standardized Tests

October 5, 2020

As another school year arrives, the preparation for standardized testing resumes as well. For years, standardized testing has been a contentious topic in America. Some believe that standardized tests such as the SAT and ACT are good ways to benchmark students. Mr. Ross Benson, a teacher in the CRLS Math Department, believes, "The problem is that most standardized testing does not measure a student's knowledge and understanding because they are mostly multiple choice." Most standardized tests are no longer penalizing students for ‘guessing’ the answer when they are in a time crunch. This makes it so students' scores can possibly increase even if they did not have the full understanding of a question they were being tested on. A student's answer to a short answer and open response question is another story—you can only receive credit on these questions if you show correct work, which blatantly displays if a student understands the material. Mr. Benson adds, “The Advanced Placement testing that happened last year was the best possible online standardized testing I have seen.” Mr. Benson continues, saying, “That being said, if I was a college I wouldn't give anyone credit for doing well on these exams because they didn't cover a lot of the curriculum.”

The Student Newspaper of Cambridge Rindge and Latin
News