The Register Forum

The Dangers of Social Media News: Why Fact-Checking Is Important

The Dangers of Social Media News: Why Fact-Checking Is Important

June 16, 2020

The word “news” has seemingly evolved over just the short span of our lifetime. What was once the near-sole purview of institutions such as the New...

“ACAB” and the History of Policing in America

June 16, 2020

ACAB. This effectively polarizing statement meaning “all cops are bast*rds,” or 1312, the alphabetical order of the acronym, originates from the 1970s....

The Cons of Cancel Culture in Quarantine

The Cons of Cancel Culture in Quarantine

June 16, 2020

Once upon a time, people would cancel things: their Netflix subscription, a doctor’s appointment, plans on a Tuesday. However, as the world modernized, ...

White Woman Calls the Police on Black Man in Central Park

White Woman Calls the Police on Black Man in Central Park

June 16, 2020

First came the video of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man, murdered by a white police officer. After that, there was the video of another black man,...

How TikTok is Ruining the Music Industry

How TikTok is Ruining the Music Industry

June 16, 2020

A couple days ago, I sat outside my house while shuffling through songs in the Spotify playlists I had made and felt generally uninspired by them. Realizing that most of my current music bored me, I decided to play the Today’s Top Hits playlist, featuring America’s newest and most popular songs. As I continued listening, however, I had a horrifying realization that I recognized every single song, but not for a good reason. All of the tunes that I listened to had been played repeatedly on the popular social media platform TikTok. Many of the songs are catchy, and it is obvious that numerous people listen to them on a regular basis. However, the fact that I had heard almost every song so many times ruined them for me. Gone are the days when I could listen to Myron by Lil Uzi Vert without picturing a TikTok “influencer” thrusting their hips towards my screen in a vulgar manner. Gone are the days when I could hear a perfectly good song by The Weeknd without visualizing another amateur indie-coming-of-age-I’m-not-like-other-kids movie. TikTok’s ability to make a song viral overnight has overrun the music industry and significantly detracted from its integrity. Some might argue that if a song is popular on TikTok in the first place, it must be widely recognized. Although this is true in some cases, the vast majority of songs found on TikTok start out relatively unknown.

How Massachusetts Can Reopen

Eliza Sutton, Contributing Writer

May 30, 2020

COVID-19, discovered in the winter of 2019 in Wuhan, China, has been noticeably upsetting the normalcy of people’s everyday lives since the beginning of 2020, when it emerged as a viral health problem. Five months later and the virus has spread to all corners of the globe, bringing mass disruption with it.  In Massachusetts, “normal” life essentially ended the week of March 8th. Just two days later, on March 10th, Governor Baker declared Massachusetts to be in a state of emergency. On Friday of that week, March 13th, Cambridge Public schools announced closure, and now all Massachusetts schools are closed for the remainder of the school year. Beginning on March 24th, all non-essential businesses have also been required to close. The official reopening date for these businesses is May 18th, but given how many times this date has already been pushed back, it’s probable that these closures will extend further. As a further precaution, as of May 6th, the entirety of Massachusetts has been mandated to wear facemasks in any public location indefinitely.

No, Trump is not to Blame for the Effects of the Pandemic on America

No, Trump is not to Blame for the Effects of the Pandemic on America

May 28, 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has had an unprecedented effect on American society. At the time of writing this article, nearly 90,000 US citizens have died from the virus and over a million have been infected. The United States has found itself unprepared for this pandemic, and our lackluster response has been clearly illustrated in the nation’s shortage of masks, drugs, and ventilators. Many people are understandably angry that the US did not take more effective steps to curtail the impacts of this pandemic, and most of the blame was put on President Trump. Despite this anger, and even despite some critical and continued missteps in his response, Trump has acted reasonably overall. The true culprit in this scenario is not an uninformed and error-prone president, but a woeful lack of preparation at the national level that stems back decades.[pullquote speaker="" photo="" align="left" background="off" border="none" shadow="off"]The true culprit in this scenario is not an uninformed and error-prone president, but a woeful lack of preparation at the national level that stems back decades.[/pullquote] Even though Trump isn’t to blame for putting the US in the situation it is in now, it is clear that his actions in office have undermined the effectiveness of our response to the virus. First, Trump's initial effort to downplay the virulence of the coronavirus, perhaps to assuage public fears and maintain forward momentum in the stock market, was dangerous and made people less afraid than perhaps they should have been about the threat of the coronavirus. Additionally, Trump seems compelled to comment about medical issues far beyond his field of expertise—such as the benefit of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19 and his suggestion that disinfections could be used as a medicine—undermine Trump’s position of authority.

Protesting For Your Right to Get Sick

Protesting For Your Right to Get Sick

May 28, 2020

As the period of stay-at-home orders nears two months, businesses across America only continue to suffer. Mounting frustration over a situation that seemingly...

The Importance of Hope

The Importance of Hope

May 27, 2020

Isolated—alone if not lonely, battered by a storm of foreboding news—it is easy to lose hope these days. Some say hope is a dangerous thing but, on the contrary, it is a way to survive, and an imperative force to hold tight to.  You certainly aren’t alone if you have been feeling a distinct loss of hope as of late. Many of our days are burdened by paradox, in more ways than one. May, at least for seniors, is traditionally a time of relief, joy, excitement, and celebration. This year, of course, is different. As we imagine ourselves taking flight, gaining independence, it is difficult to ignore how incredibly stuck we are. On top of this, many of us are about to embark on educational journeys in hopes of creating change, but how can we be so forward-looking when so much is going wrong right now, everything piling on top of each other like a suffocating avalanche of bad news? Such is the roller coaster of quarantine-induced emotion.

The Potential Death Toll Is Too High: Why Reopening Must Wait

The Potential Death Toll Is Too High: Why Reopening Must Wait

May 26, 2020

There is an inverse relationship between continued social distancing and the strength of the US economy; the longer quarantine lasts, the more Americans file ...

Meditation: The Path to a Stress-Free Pandemic

Meditation: The Path to a Stress-Free Pandemic

May 26, 2020

Meditation is often misconceived to be hours long, a waste of time, or useless. Although it is widely associated with religious practices, any person can...

As of April 30th, there are over three million confirmed cases of the coronavirus worldwide.

A Look at the Coronavirus in the Context of Other Pandemics in History

April 30, 2020

Worldwide, cases of the novel coronavirus have soared past three million, killing over 230,000, and have caused one of the worst weeks for the stock m...

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