The Register Forum

Faith, Trust, and Pixie Dust: What Finding Neverland Taught Us about Senior Year

Finding+Neverland+spent+two+weeks+in+Boston+this+August.
Finding Neverland spent two weeks in Boston this August.

Finding Neverland spent two weeks in Boston this August.

Grace Ramsdell

Grace Ramsdell

Finding Neverland spent two weeks in Boston this August.

Grace Ramsdell and Sophie Harrington

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






This summer, the Broadway musical Finding Neverland spent two weeks at the Boston Opera House. On behalf of the Register Forum, we attended opening night in Boston on August 8th. Over a month later, the musical still left us comparing our own lives to the story of J.M. Barrie.

Finding Neverland chronicles British author J.M. Barrie’s playwriting career and the creation of his most enduring character: Peter Pan. Much of the musical centers on Barrie’s frustration with the conventional—he is constantly persuaded to write only plays that the owner of his theater knows will get an audience. The magic doesn’t begin until Barrie meets members of the Davies family, who remind him of the importance of imagination and doing the unexpected.

Under the direction of Diane Paulus and featuring passionate performances from Billy Tighe as Barrie and talented child-actors as the Davies children, this story truly came to life in the Boston Opera House. At the time, we appreciated the musical as a reminder of one of our favorite childhood tales, and it was fun to see some of its characters in a new light. However, our true appreciation for the production evolved in the weeks after we first saw it.

Once we got back to school, we realized that Barrie’s lessons on the importance of creativity not only apply to life in general, but are particularly valuable to seniors in high school. As we think about our futures—whether they involve applying to colleges that we know have certain expectations or following other paths in the grown-up world after graduation—we can’t let ourselves lose our sense of adventure.

In the upcoming months, many of us students will experience pressure. In moments of stress and frustration, it is essential that we take a step back. It is only after Barrie distances himself from the negative pressures in his life that he is able to find Neverland.

In moments of stress and frustration, it is essential that we take a step back. It is only after Barrie distances himself from the negative pressures in his life that he is able to find Neverland.”

That said, there’s nothing like live theater to provide a distraction from the trials and tribulations of your own personal daily life, and CRLS students are surrounded by local theater opportunities. In addition to our own school’s productions, CRLS students can see shows for as little as $25 at theaters like the American Repertory Theatre (A.R.T.) in Harvard Square—where Finding Neverland debuted in 2014.

Theater can be a distraction, but a good show can also serve as a guide. We went to Finding Neverland thinking it would provide a bit of escapism—a two-hour return to our childhood—but at the end of the day, we were left considering what “second star to the right, straight on till morning” can mean to each of us.

This piece also appears in our September print edition.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Student Newspaper of Cambridge Rindge and Latin
Faith, Trust, and Pixie Dust: What Finding Neverland Taught Us about Senior Year